Swedish orange bread

Swedish orange bread


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This sweet, moist loaf was inspired by the tempting Swedish speciality called limpa, a rye bread sweetened with molasses and flavoured with orange zest and anise seed.

Elaine Russell

Serves: 16 

  • 1 ½ cups (185 g) rye flour
  • 1 cup (140 g) plain flour
  • 1 cup (140 g) wholemeal flour
  • 1 sachet (7 g) dried yeast
  • 1 ½ tbsp soft brown sugar
  • 1 tbsp grated orange zest
  • 1 tbsp anise seed
  • 1 tsp salt
  • ¾ cup (185 ml) low-fat milk
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) golden syrup
  • 1 tbsp extra-light olive oil
  • ½ cup (125 ml) freshly squeezed orange juice

Preparation:2hours15min  ›  Cook:1hour50min  ›  Ready in:4hours5min 

  1. Combine 1 cup (125 g) of the rye flour, the plain flour, wholemeal flour, yeast, sugar, orange zest, anise seed and salt in a large bowl. Make a well in the centre.
  2. Combine the milk, golden syrup and oil in a small saucepan. Heat over a low heat until very hot (48–54°C). Add the hot milk mixture and then the orange juice to the well in the dry ingredients and stir until thoroughly combined. Transfer the dough to a lightly floured work surface and knead in the remaining rye flour. Knead until the dough is smooth and elastic – this will take about 7 minutes.
  3. Spray a large bowl with cooking spray. Place the dough in the bowl, turning it to coat. Cover and let rise in a warm spot until doubled, about 1½ hours.
  4. Punch the dough down and shape into a high round ball. Spray a large baking tray with cooking spray. Place the ball on the baking tray, cover loosely with a damp tea towel and let rise until doubled, about 30 minutes. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  5. Bake the bread until it is golden brown and the bottom of the loaf sounds hollow when tapped, about 45 minutes. Remove from the baking tray and cool on a wire rack for 1 hour before slicing.

Some more ideas…

Rye flour is made out of the rye grain It is available in the health-food aisle of most supermarkets; alternatively, try your local health-food store. * Anise seed has a licorice flavour If you can't find it, you can use fennel seeds instead; these are sweeter and milder than anise but will work just as well in this bread.

Health points

Along with its rich flavour, rye flour provides magnesium and riboflavin, plus folate to help your heart. And a diet high in rye fibre may reduce the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol levels.

Each serving provides

GI estimate medium.

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