Drunken Noodles (Pad Kee Mao)

    (66)
    40 minutes

    Pad Kee Mao is a common late night street food in Bangkok, traditionally served to nightclubbers coming home in the wee hours of the morning - hence the name!


    56 people made this

    Ingredients
    Serves: 4 

    • 100g wide Thai-style rice noodles
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 1/2 teaspoon thick soy sauce
    • 2 teaspoons white sugar
    • 1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced
    • 250g pork, thinly sliced
    • 1 small chilli, minced, or more to taste
    • 30 fresh basil leaves, chopped
    • 1/2 teaspoon thick soy sauce
    • 1 teaspoon white sugar
    • 1 teaspoon salt
    • 1/2 cup bean sprouts

    Directions
    Preparation:20min  ›  Cook:20min  ›  Ready in:40min 

    1. Place the rice noodles in a bowl, cover with hot water and let soak until white and softened, about 1 hour. Drain the noodles and set aside.
    2. Heat 1 1/2 teaspoons of olive oil in a wok or large frypan over low heat, and cook and stir 2 minced garlic cloves until brown and beginning to crisp, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir in the soaked noodles, 1/2 teaspoon of thick soy sauce and 2 teaspoons of sugar, and cook and stir until the noodles have absorbed the soy sauce and turned brown, about 3 minutes. Remove the noodles from the frypan.
    3. Heat the remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons of olive oil in the wok over low heat; stir in the remaining 2 minced garlic cloves and cook until brown and beginning to crisp, 2 to 3 minutes. Raise the heat to medium-high and stir in the pork, chilli, basil, 1/2 teaspoon thick soy sauce, 1 teaspoon sugar and salt. Cook and stir until the pork is no longer pink and the edges of the meat are beginning to brown, about 5 minutes. Return the noodles to the wok and stir in the bean sprouts. Cook and stir until heated through, about 5 more minutes.

    Tip:

    Look for thick soy sauce at Asian specialty grocery stores.

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    Reviews and Ratings
    Global Ratings:
    (66)

    Reviews in English (44)

    by
    49

    I made this for Dinner today, I subbed the dried Thai-style rice noodles, wide (such as Chantaboon Rice Noodles) for regular rice noodles as I had no time to go to the Asian market, I also used 1/2 a serrano pepper instead of 2 cos the kids were going to eat it too. I added some red and yellow bell peppers to compensate for the serrano pepper reduction and for added colour. We all liked this recipe and I will be making it again, Thanks DeborahB for a great recipe!  -  09 Aug 2009  (Review from Allrecipes USA and Canada)

    by
    36

    Very yummy, just a little on the too-spicy side for me (I should have either seeded my pepper or used a half). If you can't find the thick soy sauce, consider mixing 2 tsp of molasses with 1 tsp of reg. soy sauce. I used a thin-cut pork loin chop. It was really delicious, and next time I'll try with tofu for a veggie version. Thanks for the fun recipe! The spiciness was cut down by the ice cold beer I had with the dish.  -  16 Aug 2009  (Review from Allrecipes USA and Canada)

    by
    29

    This was an interesting dish to make. Don't get worried if it tastes a little weird while you're cooking it, everything comes together in the end. The ingredients in thick soy sauce are soy sauce, molasses, sugar, and salt. It can be found in a jar in the soy sauce section of an Asian market. Next time I will just try to use regular soy sauce and brown sugar instead because it had a little bit of a weird taste. I think that I kept the noodles in hot water for too long because they started to fall apart into 1" pieces... and I didn't even keep them in for the suggested full 1 hour. Definitely check the noodles while they're cooking so you don't overdo it. Otherwise, the taste was delicious.  -  09 Oct 2009  (Review from Allrecipes USA and Canada)

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