Coconut Almond Fudge

Coconut Almond Fudge


34 people made this

This is a microwave version of an Indian sweet called Nariyal Burfi. It's not fudge per se but the texture is similar. You could also substitute unsalted pistachios for almonds if you wish.

Lola in the Kitchen

Serves: 12 

  • 3 cups (155g) shredded coconut
  • 600g sweetened condensed milk
  • 2/3 cup (75g) slivered almonds
  • 1 tablespoon ground cardamom

Preparation:5min  ›  Cook:7min  ›  Extra time:1hour chilling  ›  Ready in:1hour12min 

  1. Grease a 23x23cm pan. Stir together the coconut and condensed milk in a large, microwave-safe bowl. Cook on High in the microwave for 7 minutes, stirring every 30 seconds. When the coconut mixture is hot and bubbling, stir in the almonds and cardamom. Pour into the prepared pan, and smooth the top with a spatula.
  2. Cool for 1 hour in the refrigerator, then cut into 3cm squares with a greased knife.

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Reviews (1)


This was easy to prepare and quite delicious, only I would like to see a bit more direction about the actual cooking, for the following reasons. The recipe says 600g of condensed milk. The only size can available appears to be 390g. Hence I had to scale down the other ingredients to "half and a bit more" and try to adjust the cooking accordingly too. The mixture started bubbling up (very hot) after only 2-3 minutes, and I was unsure whether this process has to keep being repeated - i.e. taking it out to stir until it subsided, then restarting for another 30 seconds - or not; and if so, how many times? I didn't know what type of colour or texture to look for. When I decided that it had probably had enough cooking (probably around the 5-minute mark), I removed it, stirred in the almonds and started spooning it into the tray. It stiffened up very quickly, but remained quite sticky. It remained fairly tacky even after a couple of hours in the fridge. The taste is lovely, but I would like to know how to make it properly and achieve a texture which is easier to handle. English fudge usually has either a slightly crumbly texture (crystallised sugar), or is soft but quite firm enough to grasp and eat without sticking to one's fingers. Can the author provide a bit more guidance on these points, please? Also, the photo does not match the description in the recipe, which describes cutting a flattened sweet cut into squares. - 02 May 2013

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